Just Diagnosed With Diabetes?
Here's Everything You Need to Know

by Mighty Well

Getting a new diagnosis can bring on complicated emotions. There may be relief at finally getting answers, fear of what your future may now look like, and overwhelming information in your search to learn as much as you can.

If you’ve just been diagnosed with diabetes, the good news is that plenty of research and resources are available to guide your journey! Here are some tips we’ve gathered from chatting with our diabetic Friends in the Fight.


Diabetes and its myriad impacts on daily life are complicated to navigate. Thankfully, there are ample resources available to help guide you through life with diabetes. So wherever you are on your journey — newly diagnosed and overwhelmed, an old-timer looking for fresh tips, or just someone trying to learn in order to better support a diagnosed Friend in the Fight — we’ve put together some resources to get you started!


Diabetic eye disease refers to a number of diseases that may occur if you’ve been diagnosed with diabetes. When you think of diabetes, eye problems are likely not the first thing that comes to mind. However, when blood sugar levels in the body rise to a level above normal, the tiny blood vessels within the eye tend to endure serious damage.

Emily Levy was diagnosed with Chronic Neurological Lyme Disease during my sophomore year of college. She needed a long-term IV PICC line that a lot of people get either for antibiotic use, chemotherapy, or nutritional support. Emily was just told to wear a cut sock on my arm, and thought, “This is crazy!”

Her dad, who is in the surfing industry, told her she should put a rashguard over it. So that’s how they got the idea to apply athletic fabric to the medical industry. That’s how Mighty Well started. It was an answer to her needs as a patient.


As COVID-19 and fears around coronavirus spread around the world, many members of our community are at the highest risk for infection. Being immunocompromised during cold and flu season is already stressful enough, and the global spread of a highly infectious virus adds significant anxiety for our Friends in the Fight, as well as the need for further precaution.


Living with chronic illness can significantly impact your confidence levels and change how you look at yourself. It’s common to feel as though your body has ‘let you down’ or ‘is broken’. These beliefs understandably make you feel less confident within yourself.

More than 29 million people live with Type 1 and Type 2 diabetes in the United States. Managing diabetes can feel like a full time job, and many of our Friends in the Fight are taking time every day to care for their bodies and turn sickness into strength while living with this chronic condition.

If you know someone living with diabetes and are searching for a gift that shows you care, check out this list of the best gifts for diabetes patients.


Some days, my relationships seem like a string of transactions and scheduling. Chronic illness ramps up these less-than-sexy aspects of relationships. Being sick requires more planning, more appointments, and often less doing. So how can we maintain and celebrate the truth of our relationships (whether friendships, romantic, family, etc.) without letting illness dominate the routine and conversation?


Right now, we all have someone we feel worried about. At least one person in our lives who is at higher risk from COVID-19. Yet worrying doesn’t necessarily lead to reaching out. We may feel awkward or unsure of how to ask how things are going. Being raised in a society that teaches us to avoid talking about differences, disability, age, health status… Bridging that discomfort doesn’t suddenly go away because of a pandemic.


The type of support needed will differ from person to person. For those of us with chronic illness (or simply too much on our plate), we may need someone to help with meal prep or safely buying ingredients.

For our Friends struggling to maintain mental health, a genuine “how are you doing?” check-in and time to actually share the answer could make all the difference. For those who cannot be with loved ones during the holidays, thoughtful interactions over video chat or snail mail could bring comfort and community to a lonely time.


Suffering the Silence’s new docu-series, Trust Me, I’m Sick, has a lot to tell us about being an ally to spoonie friends. One of the contributors, Cassandra Rush, hit the nail on the head when she shared what it’s like to be invited out by friends.

Isabelle Edwards is known across the internet as the Diabetes Diva, and if you ever have the privilege of meeting her, you will understand why! Isabelle lives with Type 2 Diabetes, but her enthusiasm for life, her kindness, and her glamour are what you remember after spending time with her. She is a fierce advocate for those living with Type 2 Diabetes and is committed to raising awareness about the disease and about life as a patient.


Erika Young: a 30-year old young professional with Type 1 Diabetes. Her illness didn’t stop her from pushing the boundaries of her physical limits. She has ran marathons around the world, including a 150-mile trek through Turks and Caicos.


Type 2 diabetes is no stranger to stigma, due to fat shaming and misinformation. Yet Halle Berry has proudly and gracefully shared her story with this common disease. She has shown that having diabetes is not something to be ashamed of — it hasn’t stopped her from having a successful career in modeling and acting! As many of our Friends have experienced, having a chronic condition helped her become the incredible woman she is.

Getting a new diagnosis can bring on complicated emotions. There may be relief at finally getting answers, fear of what your future may now look like, and overwhelming information in your search to learn as much as you can.

If you’ve just been diagnosed with diabetes, the good news is that plenty of research and resources are available to guide your journey! Here are some tips we’ve gathered from chatting with our diabetic Friends in the Fight.


Diabetes and its myriad impacts on daily life are complicated to navigate. Thankfully, there are ample resources available to help guide you through life with diabetes.

So wherever you are on your journey — newly diagnosed and overwhelmed, an old-timer looking for fresh tips, or just someone trying to learn in order to better support a diagnosed Friend in the Fight — we’ve put together some resources to get you started!


Diabetic eye disease refers to a number of diseases that may occur if you’ve been diagnosed with diabetes. When you think of diabetes, eye problems are likely not the first thing that comes to mind. However, when blood sugar levels in the body rise to a level above normal, the tiny blood vessels within the eye tend to endure serious damage.

Emily Levy was diagnosed with Chronic Neurological Lyme Disease during my sophomore year of college. She needed a long-term IV PICC line that a lot of people get either for antibiotic use, chemotherapy, or nutritional support. Emily was just told to wear a cut sock on my arm, and thought, “This is crazy!”

Her dad, who is in the surfing industry, told her she should put a rashguard over it. So that’s how they got the idea to apply athletic fabric to the medical industry. That’s how Mighty Well started. It was an answer to her needs as a patient.


As COVID-19 and fears around coronavirus spread around the world, many members of our community are at the highest risk for infection.

Being immunocompromised during cold and flu season is already stressful enough, and the global spread of a highly infectious virus adds significant anxiety for our Friends in the Fight, as well as the need for further precaution.


Living with chronic illness can significantly impact your confidence levels and change how you look at yourself. It’s common to feel as though your body has ‘let you down’ or ‘is broken’. These beliefs understandably make you feel less confident within yourself.

More than 29 million people live with Type 1 and Type 2 diabetes in the United States. Managing diabetes can feel like a full time job, and many of our Friends in the Fight are taking time every day to care for their bodies and turn sickness into strength while living with this chronic condition.

If you know someone living with diabetes and are searching for a gift that shows you care, check out this list of the best gifts for diabetes patients.


Some days, my relationships seem like a string of transactions and scheduling. Chronic illness ramps up these less-than-sexy aspects of relationships. Being sick requires more planning, more appointments, and often less doing. So how can we maintain and celebrate the truth of our relationships (whether friendships, romantic, family, etc.) without letting illness dominate the routine and conversation?


Right now, we all have someone we feel worried about. At least one person in our lives who is at higher risk from COVID-19. Yet worrying doesn’t necessarily lead to reaching out.

We may feel awkward or unsure of how to ask how things are going. Being raised in a society that teaches us to avoid talking about differences, disability, age, health status… Bridging that discomfort doesn’t suddenly go away because of a pandemic.


The type of support needed will differ from person to person. For those of us with chronic illness (or simply too much on our plate), we may need someone to help with meal prep or safely buying ingredients.

For our Friends struggling to maintain mental health, a genuine “how are you doing?” check-in and time to actually share the answer could make all the difference. For those who cannot be with loved ones during the holidays, thoughtful interactions over video chat or snail mail could bring comfort and community to a lonely time.


Suffering the Silence’s new docu-series, Trust Me, I’m Sick, has a lot to tell us about being an ally to spoonie friends. One of the contributors, Cassandra Rush, hit the nail on the head when she shared what it’s like to be invited out by friends.

Isabelle Edwards is known across the internet as the Diabetes Diva, and if you ever have the privilege of meeting her, you will understand why! Isabelle lives with Type 2 Diabetes, but her enthusiasm for life, her kindness, and her glamour are what you remember after spending time with her.

She is a fierce advocate for those living with Type 2 Diabetes and is committed to raising awareness about the disease and about life as a patient.


Erika Young: a 30-year old young professional with Type 1 Diabetes. Her illness didn’t stop her from pushing the boundaries of her physical limits. She has ran marathons around the world, including a 150-mile trek through Turks and Caicos.


Type 2 diabetes is no stranger to stigma, due to fat shaming and misinformation. Yet Halle Berry has proudly and gracefully shared her story with this common disease.

She has shown that having diabetes is not something to be ashamed of — it hasn’t stopped her from having a successful career in modeling and acting! As many of our Friends have experienced, having a chronic condition helped her become the incredible woman she is.


need a case for your diabetes supplies?

Store all of your diabetes supplies in the patient approved Self Care Case

PICCPerfect Antimicrobial PICC Line Cover By Mighty Well

Introducing the Self Care Case: created with our Friends in the Fight & customized by you.

Born from the Mighty Well MedPlanner, the Self Care Case is our latest customizable organizer. Designed to hold your critical care plus wellness needs all in one, so you can take your life’s “biggest” little essentials with you wherever.

Self care routines are as unique as our diagnoses. Your health care is stressful, and remembering your daily medications and other essentials that are important to your daily care can be overwhelming.

The Self Care Case is the Mighty Well solution to bringing peace of mind to your daily wellness needs and routine.

Its new soft case designed with more flexible interior features and customizable add-ons will keep your critical care and personal items safe and in one easy-to-carry case.

Each Self Care Case includes:

  • 2-ring binder for customization
  • Two (2) Single Pouch Resealable Storage Bags
  • Two (2) Dual Pouch Resealable Storage Bags
  • Three (3) interior flex mesh pockets: 2 small, 1 large
  • 2-way zipper with soft ergonomically designed zipper pulls
  • One (1) D-ring on the exterior

The Self Care Case can fit additional resealable storage bags - sold separately.

For the ultimate customization, additional add-ons are available:

PICCPerfect Antimicrobial PICC Line Cover By Mighty Well

Introducing the Self Care Case: created with our Friends in the Fight & customized by you.

Born from the Mighty Well MedPlanner, the Self Care Case is our latest customizable organizer. Designed to hold your critical care plus wellness needs all in one, so you can take your life’s “biggest” little essentials with you wherever.

Self care routines are as unique as our diagnoses. Your health care is stressful, and remembering your daily medications and other essentials that are important to your daily care can be overwhelming.

The Self Care Case is the Mighty Well solution to bringing peace of mind to your daily wellness needs and routine.

Its new soft case designed with more flexible interior features and customizable add-ons will keep your critical care and personal items safe and in one easy-to-carry case.

Each Self Care Case includes:

  • 2-ring binder for customization
  • Two (2) Single Pouch Resealable Storage Bags
  • Two (2) Dual Pouch Resealable Storage Bags
  • Three (3) interior flex mesh pockets: 2 small, 1 large
  • 2-way zipper with soft ergonomically designed zipper pulls
  • One (1) D-ring on the exterior

The Self Care Case can fit additional resealable storage bags - sold separately.

For the ultimate customization, additional add-ons are available:


connect with us:

Got more questions about Diabetes? Join us in our Friends in the Fight Group to connect with our community.

Disclaimer: The information in this platform is not medical advice and should not be treated as such. You must not rely on the information in this platform as an alternative to medical advice from your doctor or other professional healthcare provider. If you have any specific questions about any medical matter, you should consult your doctor or other professional healthcare provider. If you think you may be suffering from any medical condition, you should seek immediate medical attention. You should never delay seeking medical advice, disregard medical advice or discontinue medical treatment because of information in this platform.

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